Dry Run: 3 Tips for Jump Scare scene

dry run short film

APPLE VALLEY — A dark night sets the scene for short film “Dry Run” where a reporter encounters mysterious happenings on a news assignment in the rural desert. Filmmaker Curtis Fisher explains how he created the jump scare in his film to be released in early October.

The short starts with reporter Jim (Rufino Romero) arriving at a remote location to report on a story. Soon after arriving, he finds no one home. Mysterious noises are just the beginning of a more sinister danger he has to escape. He heads back to his car. This scene is where Fisher details the jump scare that takes place.

misdirection

Tip #1: Misdirection

As Jim frantically searches for the keys inside his car, the camera shows that no one is around, leading the audience to believe it’s safe outside. The quietness also deceives the audience into thinking Jim is out of harm’s way.

limiting the view

Tip #2: Limit what the audience can see

Jim looks outside his car and the audience can only see what he sees. This creates anxiety for the audience. The darkness in the movie also limits the audience’s view.

pop bang sound

Tip #3: Pop or bang sound

Jim suddenly sees a figure in the dark. The pop bang sound is heard once the figure is revealed. This sound makes the audience jump.

Mario Medina also stars as the villain. 

Fisher said he wanted to make a short horror film after a long hiatus from filmmaking. 

It was a big task because there was no crew, just myself, and a little help from the actor.  Curtis Fisher

He says creating horror is rewarding because the loyal fan base appreciates it, even if it’s a no budget film.

 

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